The product differs from DJI's other drones, which are all designed for aerial photography rather than FPV. At the same time, it bears little resemblance to competition FPV drones. Rather, this model could be DJI's attempt to capture the latest trend in drones, cinematic FPV flying.


That's backed up by DJI leaker @OsitaLV, who tweeted that the DJI FPV could have 4K 60 fps on-board recording with stabilization that's more suitable for cinema-like video than racing (comp drones generally have low-latency, low-resolution cameras). The 150 km/h (93 mph) maximum speed is also good for video but slower than the 120 mph+ speeds of competition FPV drones. All that said, the DJI FPV would be likely be great for recreational FPV flying/racing, as well.


As it stands now, high-speed cinematic FPV drones are largely cobbled together with parts, using cameras from GoPro and others, often with stabilization software like ReelSteady. Those are then fitted to special racing drones that can handle the weight. If the leak is accurate (and that's a big "if,") it means that DJI is simplifying that idea and making it more consumer friendly, just as it did with aerial photography drones.


Resource: engadget.com


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DJI's cinematic FPV drone leaks in photos

The product differs from DJI's other drones, which are all designed for aerial photography rather than FPV. At the same time, it bears little resemblance to competition FPV drones. Rather, this model could be DJI's attempt to capture the latest trend in drones, cinematic FPV flying.


That's backed up by DJI leaker @OsitaLV, who tweeted that the DJI FPV could have 4K 60 fps on-board recording with stabilization that's more suitable for cinema-like video than racing (comp drones generally have low-latency, low-resolution cameras). The 150 km/h (93 mph) maximum speed is also good for video but slower than the 120 mph+ speeds of competition FPV drones. All that said, the DJI FPV would be likely be great for recreational FPV flying/racing, as well.


As it stands now, high-speed cinematic FPV drones are largely cobbled together with parts, using cameras from GoPro and others, often with stabilization software like ReelSteady. Those are then fitted to special racing drones that can handle the weight. If the leak is accurate (and that's a big "if,") it means that DJI is simplifying that idea and making it more consumer friendly, just as it did with aerial photography drones.


Resource: engadget.com


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