Multiple Chinese regions have imposed no-alcohol rules on state employees

Civil servants and staff in state firms must not drink after work on weekdays


The policy aims to boost their work performance and the government's image 


It is also deemed crucial in preventing bribery during lavish, liquor-filled meals

Chinese authorities have released regulations to ban civil servants from drinking alcohol outside their working hours to boost their work performance and improve the government's image.


The move can help state employees concentrate on their work and avoid mistakes, according to official media.


It is also deemed crucial in the prevention of bribery, which often takes place during lavish, out-of-office meals that feature liquor.


Similar rules are now being enforced in multiple regions - including the city of Nanjing and the provinces of Gansu and Qinghai.


While some local authorities have in the past cracked down on work-related drinking events, the recent push prohibits the consumption of alcohol in officials' private time on weekdays completely.


In the county of Qingcheng in Gansu, government workers, civil servants and staff at state-run companies have been ordered not to enjoy alcoholic beverages during and after their eight hours in the office.


For those who do need to drink during the week, they must send an application to their higher-ups in advance, according to a government release.


The applicants must explain the nature of the event, the identity of other attendees and how much alcohol they plan to drink. 

The police authority of Nanjing, the capital of Jiangsu Province, demands all officers in the city not drink on workdays to 'improve the force's conduct and enforce its discipline'. 


In Nanyang, central China's Henan Province, Communist officials and civil servants will face random alcohol tests at least once a month to ensure they follow the no-drinking order. 


While in Menyuan in Qinghai, the practice has been brought in to clamp down on 'extravagance and hedonism'. 


Although most places launched the rules before or in July, the action became a trending topic this week when many Chinese are meeting family and friends for meals to celebrate the country's National Day.


Commenting on the policy from Qingcheng County, Beijing News billed it as the 'strictest alcohol ban'.


A column, which also appeared on state news agency Xinhua's website, claimed that government workers shouldered more responsibilities at work than ordinary citizens, and drinking liquor would impact their work efficiency. 


The habit would also encourage lavish spending and corruption, it added.


The article went on to criticise the ban and said it could invade government workers' privacy.


The author said though it was 'essential' to forbid booze during office hours, the decision to extend it after work was 'excessive'.

Source: Daily Mail


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China bans government workers from drinking alcohol




Multiple Chinese regions have imposed no-alcohol rules on state employees

Civil servants and staff in state firms must not drink after work on weekdays


The policy aims to boost their work performance and the government's image 


It is also deemed crucial in preventing bribery during lavish, liquor-filled meals

Chinese authorities have released regulations to ban civil servants from drinking alcohol outside their working hours to boost their work performance and improve the government's image.


The move can help state employees concentrate on their work and avoid mistakes, according to official media.


It is also deemed crucial in the prevention of bribery, which often takes place during lavish, out-of-office meals that feature liquor.


Similar rules are now being enforced in multiple regions - including the city of Nanjing and the provinces of Gansu and Qinghai.


While some local authorities have in the past cracked down on work-related drinking events, the recent push prohibits the consumption of alcohol in officials' private time on weekdays completely.


In the county of Qingcheng in Gansu, government workers, civil servants and staff at state-run companies have been ordered not to enjoy alcoholic beverages during and after their eight hours in the office.


For those who do need to drink during the week, they must send an application to their higher-ups in advance, according to a government release.


The applicants must explain the nature of the event, the identity of other attendees and how much alcohol they plan to drink. 

The police authority of Nanjing, the capital of Jiangsu Province, demands all officers in the city not drink on workdays to 'improve the force's conduct and enforce its discipline'. 


In Nanyang, central China's Henan Province, Communist officials and civil servants will face random alcohol tests at least once a month to ensure they follow the no-drinking order. 


While in Menyuan in Qinghai, the practice has been brought in to clamp down on 'extravagance and hedonism'. 


Although most places launched the rules before or in July, the action became a trending topic this week when many Chinese are meeting family and friends for meals to celebrate the country's National Day.


Commenting on the policy from Qingcheng County, Beijing News billed it as the 'strictest alcohol ban'.


A column, which also appeared on state news agency Xinhua's website, claimed that government workers shouldered more responsibilities at work than ordinary citizens, and drinking liquor would impact their work efficiency. 


The habit would also encourage lavish spending and corruption, it added.


The article went on to criticise the ban and said it could invade government workers' privacy.


The author said though it was 'essential' to forbid booze during office hours, the decision to extend it after work was 'excessive'.

Source: Daily Mail


Become an online tutor. Apply to be a tutor on Thewaijiao.com



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