Political Correctness Is Not the Right Cure for Racism

Protests over the death of George Floyd has been rattling America. The victims last words I cant breathe are echoing around the world. Other than asking for the conviction of the four police officers, itappears that a lot ofpeople are demandingsystemic change to address the issue of racism.

For a long time, stigma has been attached to racism. Even some notorious racistswouldnotopenlyadmit they are racists.In ObamaClinton and other liberal politicians speeches, there must be some lines mentioning equal rights for African , Latino and Asian Americans. Anti-racism has long beenthe politically correct thing to do,and people go so far as to avoid usingracially sensitive wordslikeblacklist, while racism still lurks in institutions and among ordinary people, and in some cases looks tenacious and poisonous as ever.

Why the political correctness on race does not seem to work?

Treating racial equality as a doctrine is oversimplifying and lack of persuasiveness.

Treating it as a political issue fails to answer some questions arising from daily observation. People of another race look apparently different from themselves, and often display certain tendency in their behavior. All men are created equal is a conclusion that brings about a lot of questions that need to be answered. The concept of racial equality , like other doctrines, is still based on faith or even religion. Asking people to becolorblindisto some extent, counterintuitive and evading the questions people are eager to ask.

1=1x=yxyxyx=y

Concerning peoples perspective on racial equality, the best analogy I can think of is an equation in Math. The equation of 1=1 is easy to understand because you can see the numbers on both sides are the same. When you say x=y, because x and y look different, you need to demonstrate what x and y stand for respectfully, and why they are equal. Political correctness is like someone telling you there is a doctrine you need to remember and adhere to, without convincing you why this doctrine is true.

For the police officers working on the street and bearing the brunt of violence, requiring them to adhere to one simple doctrine

is not enough. Even the bill, proposed by American Congressional Democrats recently, or other legislation aiming at overcoming racism might fail miserably. The reason is simple. Any law must depend on law enforcement personnel to be enforced. When the law is targeting systemic problems in law enforcement agencies, there will be conflicts which would distort the execution of the law, or make the cost of supervising the supervisors unbearable.

So what is the solution?

The truth of all men are created equal should be more than self-evident.

It was a true genius idea claiming the declaration ofall men are created equalto be self-evident. But what if some people are not satisfied with that and asking for real evidence? In that case, how a better job can be done of convincing people the righteousness and truthfulness of racial equality?

xy

In fact, modern anthropology has offered some answers to that. Most anthropologists agreed that all humans originated in Africa. It is safe to say that x and y have the same origin. More importantly, through the research on archaeological discoveries, experts already convincingly displayed that geographic locations ultimately determined the different racial features. Different stages of development for societies and various cultures are not decided by the innate discrepancy in genes.

Instead of requiring people to becolorblind, we should face the question of how we are different, why we are different, if we have much more in common, the reasons why racial discrimination exist, and finally how our racial stereotypes can be wrong. In that sense, racial equality can never be achieved through better police training or more stringent regulations. Only through decent anthropology and history education, people could reach some real consensus about race.

,

In history, political correctness greatly helped raising awareness about racial equality. But in reality, it can only get us so far. Nest step? An upgraded educationalbeit far less dramatic than new legislature or policing reform, seems like the only effective way.

And surely America is not the only country that needs to address the race issue.

\n

Political Correctness Is Not the Right Cure for Racism

Protests over the death of George Floyd has been rattling America. The victims last words I cant breathe are echoing around the world. Other than asking for the conviction of the four police officers, itappears that a lot ofpeople are demandingsystemic change to address the issue of racism.

For a long time, stigma has been attached to racism. Even some notorious racistswouldnotopenlyadmit they are racists.In ObamaClinton and other liberal politicians speeches, there must be some lines mentioning equal rights for African , Latino and Asian Americans. Anti-racism has long beenthe politically correct thing to do,and people go so far as to avoid usingracially sensitive wordslikeblacklist, while racism still lurks in institutions and among ordinary people, and in some cases looks tenacious and poisonous as ever.

Why the political correctness on race does not seem to work?

Treating racial equality as a doctrine is oversimplifying and lack of persuasiveness.

Treating it as a political issue fails to answer some questions arising from daily observation. People of another race look apparently different from themselves, and often display certain tendency in their behavior. All men are created equal is a conclusion that brings about a lot of questions that need to be answered. The concept of racial equality , like other doctrines, is still based on faith or even religion. Asking people to becolorblindisto some extent, counterintuitive and evading the questions people are eager to ask.

1=1x=yxyxyx=y

Concerning peoples perspective on racial equality, the best analogy I can think of is an equation in Math. The equation of 1=1 is easy to understand because you can see the numbers on both sides are the same. When you say x=y, because x and y look different, you need to demonstrate what x and y stand for respectfully, and why they are equal. Political correctness is like someone telling you there is a doctrine you need to remember and adhere to, without convincing you why this doctrine is true.

For the police officers working on the street and bearing the brunt of violence, requiring them to adhere to one simple doctrine

is not enough. Even the bill, proposed by American Congressional Democrats recently, or other legislation aiming at overcoming racism might fail miserably. The reason is simple. Any law must depend on law enforcement personnel to be enforced. When the law is targeting systemic problems in law enforcement agencies, there will be conflicts which would distort the execution of the law, or make the cost of supervising the supervisors unbearable.

So what is the solution?

The truth of all men are created equal should be more than self-evident.

It was a true genius idea claiming the declaration ofall men are created equalto be self-evident. But what if some people are not satisfied with that and asking for real evidence? In that case, how a better job can be done of convincing people the righteousness and truthfulness of racial equality?

xy

In fact, modern anthropology has offered some answers to that. Most anthropologists agreed that all humans originated in Africa. It is safe to say that x and y have the same origin. More importantly, through the research on archaeological discoveries, experts already convincingly displayed that geographic locations ultimately determined the different racial features. Different stages of development for societies and various cultures are not decided by the innate discrepancy in genes.

Instead of requiring people to becolorblind, we should face the question of how we are different, why we are different, if we have much more in common, the reasons why racial discrimination exist, and finally how our racial stereotypes can be wrong. In that sense, racial equality can never be achieved through better police training or more stringent regulations. Only through decent anthropology and history education, people could reach some real consensus about race.

,

In history, political correctness greatly helped raising awareness about racial equality. But in reality, it can only get us so far. Nest step? An upgraded educationalbeit far less dramatic than new legislature or policing reform, seems like the only effective way.

And surely America is not the only country that needs to address the race issue.

\n

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