Father and the Donkey



Banwarilal is a simple soul who believes whatever he is told. The village boys are aware of this and exploit his simplicity for a few laughs. One day, Banwarilal is on his way to the market with his son to sell their donkey. He comes across some village boys out to have fun.


Seeing the father and son duo walking with the donkey, they first suggest that let the son ride on the donkey and save the effort. The son is put on the donkeys back. The boys then ridicule the boy for riding while the father walks. The father and son switch places. The father rides while the son walks. The boys then taunt the father for making the poor son walk and advise the duo to ride the donkey together.


Thinking it a good idea they comply. The poor donkey collapses from exhaustion. The boys then express their disgust at the duo for ill-treating the donkey and advice that they take the donkey to an animal doctor. The duo again follows the advice.


On the way, they come across barking stray dogs. In the confusion that ensues, the donkey falls into the flowing river. The donkey is lost forever. Banwarilal loses the donkey because he follows what he is suggested without thinking for himself.


Moral: He who listens to everybody will only become a laughing stock.



Previously Shared Stories, 

Enjoy Reading;


| Bond of Love and the Truth

| The Circle of Good Deed

| The Seven Wonders

| The Frog in Hot Water

| Your Chance of a Greater Good

| The Bridge

| Your Chance of a Greater Good

| Act of Kindness and Goodwill

| Happiness and Sorrow

| Developing a Relationship

| Dont let anyone steal your dreams.

| The Needs and Desires

| The Ant and The Dove

| The Lion and a Clever Fox

| Sometimes Just let it be

| Choose Your Words Wisely

| Hundred Gold Coins & Birbal

| Farmers Well & Witty Birbal

| Tenali Rama and the Brinjal Curry

| How long can you keep hatred in your heart?

| Appreciation of Hard Work

| Little Boys Meeting with God

| 100 Percent Love

| An Old Man Lived in the Village

| A Kings Painting

| This was bound to happen

| Wealth without a Value

| Learn to Appreciate

| Fox and The Goat

| The Golden Egg

| Who is Happy? The Peacock and The Crow

| The Three Questions

| The Old Man and the Three Young Men

| The Bear and The Two Friends

| Think Before You Judge

| Georgie Porgie

| A Wise Old Owl

| Baa Baa Black Sheep

| Beg Your Pardon Mrs Hardin

| A limit of your Kindness

| The Man and The Little Cat

| The False Human Belief

| Making Relations Special

| The Monkey and The Crocodile

| The Wicked Barbers Plight

| The Wooden Bowl

| Smartest Man in the World

| The Little Mouse

| Helping Others

| Fear vs Respect

| Little Boys Love for his Family

| Unity is Strength

| The Pig and The Sheep

| Father Son Conversation

| Whats for Dinner

| The Poor Mans Wealth
| Grandpas Table

| The Lazy Farmer

| Who or What do we love more?

| The Three Types of People

| The Cat, the Partridge and the Hare

| Birbals Wisdom

| The Travelers and The Plane Tree

| Boys Job Appraisal

| Birbal caught the Thief

| Five More Minutes

| The Kite without a thread

| Lesson Learned

| The Wet Pants

| Cycle of Evil

| The Farmer and the Snake

| A Man with a Lamp

| The King and Macaw Parrots

| A friend in need is a friend indeed.

| A Town Mouse and A Country Mouse

| Rose for Mother

| The Praying Hands

| One who read the future

| Always let your boss have the first say

| Crows in the Kingdom

| The Dreaming Priest

| Information Please

| Why Should I feel Bad?

| Two Frogs

| Baby Camel and Mother

| The Eternal Bond of Brother and Sister

| Dont let anyone steal your dreams.

| Always let your boss have the first say

| The Man and the Lion

| The Needy King and a Sage

| The Pot of the Wit

| Wealth without a Value

| The Eagle and the Woodcutter

| The Wild Doves

| The Swan and the Owl

| Zeus and the Potsherds

| The Wise Old Man

| Having a Best Friend

| A Soldiers Story

| Never to Give Up

| Looking at Mirror

| Lazy Donkey

| Controlling Temper

| Gift from Daughter






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| Father and the Donkey

Father and the Donkey



Banwarilal is a simple soul who believes whatever he is told. The village boys are aware of this and exploit his simplicity for a few laughs. One day, Banwarilal is on his way to the market with his son to sell their donkey. He comes across some village boys out to have fun.


Seeing the father and son duo walking with the donkey, they first suggest that let the son ride on the donkey and save the effort. The son is put on the donkeys back. The boys then ridicule the boy for riding while the father walks. The father and son switch places. The father rides while the son walks. The boys then taunt the father for making the poor son walk and advise the duo to ride the donkey together.


Thinking it a good idea they comply. The poor donkey collapses from exhaustion. The boys then express their disgust at the duo for ill-treating the donkey and advice that they take the donkey to an animal doctor. The duo again follows the advice.


On the way, they come across barking stray dogs. In the confusion that ensues, the donkey falls into the flowing river. The donkey is lost forever. Banwarilal loses the donkey because he follows what he is suggested without thinking for himself.


Moral: He who listens to everybody will only become a laughing stock.



Previously Shared Stories, 

Enjoy Reading;


| Bond of Love and the Truth

| The Circle of Good Deed

| The Seven Wonders

| The Frog in Hot Water

| Your Chance of a Greater Good

| The Bridge

| Your Chance of a Greater Good

| Act of Kindness and Goodwill

| Happiness and Sorrow

| Developing a Relationship

| Dont let anyone steal your dreams.

| The Needs and Desires

| The Ant and The Dove

| The Lion and a Clever Fox

| Sometimes Just let it be

| Choose Your Words Wisely

| Hundred Gold Coins & Birbal

| Farmers Well & Witty Birbal

| Tenali Rama and the Brinjal Curry

| How long can you keep hatred in your heart?

| Appreciation of Hard Work

| Little Boys Meeting with God

| 100 Percent Love

| An Old Man Lived in the Village

| A Kings Painting

| This was bound to happen

| Wealth without a Value

| Learn to Appreciate

| Fox and The Goat

| The Golden Egg

| Who is Happy? The Peacock and The Crow

| The Three Questions

| The Old Man and the Three Young Men

| The Bear and The Two Friends

| Think Before You Judge

| Georgie Porgie

| A Wise Old Owl

| Baa Baa Black Sheep

| Beg Your Pardon Mrs Hardin

| A limit of your Kindness

| The Man and The Little Cat

| The False Human Belief

| Making Relations Special

| The Monkey and The Crocodile

| The Wicked Barbers Plight

| The Wooden Bowl

| Smartest Man in the World

| The Little Mouse

| Helping Others

| Fear vs Respect

| Little Boys Love for his Family

| Unity is Strength

| The Pig and The Sheep

| Father Son Conversation

| Whats for Dinner

| The Poor Mans Wealth
| Grandpas Table

| The Lazy Farmer

| Who or What do we love more?

| The Three Types of People

| The Cat, the Partridge and the Hare

| Birbals Wisdom

| The Travelers and The Plane Tree

| Boys Job Appraisal

| Birbal caught the Thief

| Five More Minutes

| The Kite without a thread

| Lesson Learned

| The Wet Pants

| Cycle of Evil

| The Farmer and the Snake

| A Man with a Lamp

| The King and Macaw Parrots

| A friend in need is a friend indeed.

| A Town Mouse and A Country Mouse

| Rose for Mother

| The Praying Hands

| One who read the future

| Always let your boss have the first say

| Crows in the Kingdom

| The Dreaming Priest

| Information Please

| Why Should I feel Bad?

| Two Frogs

| Baby Camel and Mother

| The Eternal Bond of Brother and Sister

| Dont let anyone steal your dreams.

| Always let your boss have the first say

| The Man and the Lion

| The Needy King and a Sage

| The Pot of the Wit

| Wealth without a Value

| The Eagle and the Woodcutter

| The Wild Doves

| The Swan and the Owl

| Zeus and the Potsherds

| The Wise Old Man

| Having a Best Friend

| A Soldiers Story

| Never to Give Up

| Looking at Mirror

| Lazy Donkey

| Controlling Temper

| Gift from Daughter






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