Foreigners in China who flout the countrys coronavirus quarantine rules risk losing their visas, being deported and banned from re-entry for up to 10 years, Beijing said on Friday as it seeks to curb a rise in imported infections.


The warning, from the National Immigration Administration, came as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases involving overseas travellers, who account for the bulk of the new infections, has surged over the past week.


Just as Chinese citizens face being fined or detained for refusing temperature checks or flouting isolation rules, so quarantine evaders from other countries will be held accountable under Chinese law, the agency said in a statement on its website.


Alongside a list of relevant laws and regulations, it said public securities authorities would decide on how foreign violators should be punished, with the penalties ranging from cancelling a visa, to issuing an order to exit China within a time limit, repatriation or deportation.


People who are effectively expelled from China are not allowed to re-enter the country for between 12 months and 10 years.


The virus knows no national borders. Everyone around the world must take responsibility in fighting the epidemic, the notice said.


Over the past month, China has tightened controls at all points of entry, especially those around Beijing, and grounded most international flights.


On March 28, the government imposed a ban on all foreigners entering the country, including those with visas and residence permits. A few days later, it took the unprecedented step of asking foreign diplomats not to return to China before May 15, citing an unspecified number of coronavirus infections among its vast diplomatic corps.


Just this week, Mi Feng, spokesman for the National Health Commission, and Liu Haitao, director of the National Immigration Administrations border inspection department, said that China had banned entry to visitors from abroad at all ports along its 22,000km (13,700 mile) land border.


There have been sporadic reports of foreigners flouting Chinas stringent quarantine rules.


When three of them reportedly jumped the queue early this month for coronavirus testing in the eastern coastal city of Qingdao, the Communist Partys mouthpiece Peoples Daily denounced their behaviour and said foreigners must not enjoy special treatment.


Late last month, officials at Beijing International Airport denied entry to four foreigners for not complying with local regulations while police in Guangzhou last week opened a criminal investigation into a Nigerian coronavirus patient accused of assaulting a nurse who refused him permission to leave hospital.


As the Covid-19 pandemic has raged around the world, many Chinese have complained of a spike in racist and xenophobic attacks and insults in Western countries. As Beijing seeks to curb the rise in imported cases there are fears that similar discrimination could be directed towards foreigners living and working in China.


In recent weeks there have been reports of foreign diplomats, businesspeople and students being refused service at restaurants and bars in Beijing and other cities.


In the south China city of Guangzhou, which is home to a vibrant African community, there has been a surge in complaints over the past two weeks of Africans being evicted or otherwise discriminated against amid rumours of a coronavirus outbreak within their communities and neighbourhoods.


The reports prompted authorities in the city and Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian to speak out this week to quell the rumours and insist that China would not tolerate any form of racism or discrimination.


Source: South China Morning Post





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Foreigners deported and banned from re-entry for up to 10 years


Foreigners in China who flout the countrys coronavirus quarantine rules risk losing their visas, being deported and banned from re-entry for up to 10 years, Beijing said on Friday as it seeks to curb a rise in imported infections.


The warning, from the National Immigration Administration, came as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases involving overseas travellers, who account for the bulk of the new infections, has surged over the past week.


Just as Chinese citizens face being fined or detained for refusing temperature checks or flouting isolation rules, so quarantine evaders from other countries will be held accountable under Chinese law, the agency said in a statement on its website.


Alongside a list of relevant laws and regulations, it said public securities authorities would decide on how foreign violators should be punished, with the penalties ranging from cancelling a visa, to issuing an order to exit China within a time limit, repatriation or deportation.


People who are effectively expelled from China are not allowed to re-enter the country for between 12 months and 10 years.


The virus knows no national borders. Everyone around the world must take responsibility in fighting the epidemic, the notice said.


Over the past month, China has tightened controls at all points of entry, especially those around Beijing, and grounded most international flights.


On March 28, the government imposed a ban on all foreigners entering the country, including those with visas and residence permits. A few days later, it took the unprecedented step of asking foreign diplomats not to return to China before May 15, citing an unspecified number of coronavirus infections among its vast diplomatic corps.


Just this week, Mi Feng, spokesman for the National Health Commission, and Liu Haitao, director of the National Immigration Administrations border inspection department, said that China had banned entry to visitors from abroad at all ports along its 22,000km (13,700 mile) land border.


There have been sporadic reports of foreigners flouting Chinas stringent quarantine rules.


When three of them reportedly jumped the queue early this month for coronavirus testing in the eastern coastal city of Qingdao, the Communist Partys mouthpiece Peoples Daily denounced their behaviour and said foreigners must not enjoy special treatment.


Late last month, officials at Beijing International Airport denied entry to four foreigners for not complying with local regulations while police in Guangzhou last week opened a criminal investigation into a Nigerian coronavirus patient accused of assaulting a nurse who refused him permission to leave hospital.


As the Covid-19 pandemic has raged around the world, many Chinese have complained of a spike in racist and xenophobic attacks and insults in Western countries. As Beijing seeks to curb the rise in imported cases there are fears that similar discrimination could be directed towards foreigners living and working in China.


In recent weeks there have been reports of foreign diplomats, businesspeople and students being refused service at restaurants and bars in Beijing and other cities.


In the south China city of Guangzhou, which is home to a vibrant African community, there has been a surge in complaints over the past two weeks of Africans being evicted or otherwise discriminated against amid rumours of a coronavirus outbreak within their communities and neighbourhoods.


The reports prompted authorities in the city and Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian to speak out this week to quell the rumours and insist that China would not tolerate any form of racism or discrimination.


Source: South China Morning Post





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