China will ban incivilities including eating, begging and peddling in subway from Wednesday, according to a new regulation.


In view of the no-food clause, the regulation makes exceptions to passengers with special needs such as infants and patients.


The regulation on the operation and management of urban rail passenger transit, which is to take effect on April 1, also prohibits littering and busking in carriages.


"Behaviors such as begging and peddling disrupt the public order and compromise passenger's travel experience. They tend to cause passenger disputes, especially in the rush hour," said Wang Xiuchun, an official with the Ministry of Transport.


The bans mainly aim to maintain public order and create a good travel environment, Wang noted.


In addition, the regulation asks passengers to use earphones when using electronic gadgets instead of setting their speakers aloud.


China's urban rail transit system has developed rapidly in recent years. By the end of 2018, 171 rail transit lines had been put into operation in 35 cities in 24 provincial-level regions on the Chinese mainland.




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China bans eating, begging, peddling in subway



China will ban incivilities including eating, begging and peddling in subway from Wednesday, according to a new regulation.


In view of the no-food clause, the regulation makes exceptions to passengers with special needs such as infants and patients.


The regulation on the operation and management of urban rail passenger transit, which is to take effect on April 1, also prohibits littering and busking in carriages.


"Behaviors such as begging and peddling disrupt the public order and compromise passenger's travel experience. They tend to cause passenger disputes, especially in the rush hour," said Wang Xiuchun, an official with the Ministry of Transport.


The bans mainly aim to maintain public order and create a good travel environment, Wang noted.


In addition, the regulation asks passengers to use earphones when using electronic gadgets instead of setting their speakers aloud.


China's urban rail transit system has developed rapidly in recent years. By the end of 2018, 171 rail transit lines had been put into operation in 35 cities in 24 provincial-level regions on the Chinese mainland.




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