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An Italian doctor has described the heartbreaking final moments of dozens of coronavirus patients before they succumb to the deadly virus. 


Doctor Francesca Cortellaro, who works at Milan's San Carlo Borromeo hospital, has had to witness patients saying goodbye to their relatives before they die alone. 


And Dr Cortellaro described the 'dramatic' feeling of watching patients say their final goodbyes to relatives, including one grandmother who she helped to say farewell to her granddaughter. 


A patient is carried from an ambulance at a hospital in Rome


The doctor told Italian newspaper Il Giornale: 'You know what's most dramatic?


'Seeing patients dying alone, listening to them as they beg you to say goodbye to their children and grandchildren.'


She added: 'They are lucid, they do not go into narcolepsy. It is as if they were drowning, but with time to understand it.


'When they are about to die, they sense it'.


And describing the moment where she did her best to help the critically ill grandmother, she said: 'I pulled out the phone and called her on video.


'They said goodbye. Soon after she was gone.'


The doctor added that she now has a long 'farewell' list of similar calls which she has helped patients to make.


Dr Cortellaro is just one of thousands of medics in the country who are battling on what is Europe's coronavirus front line - there have so far been more than 47,000 cases of the infection in Italy, more than any other country on the continent. 


Earlier today, distressing footage showed desperate scenes of doctors frantically trying to treat multiple patients inside a makeshift intensive care unit in an Italian hospital. 



With the site's Intensive Care Unit full, a separate emergency ward was full of patients on trolleys. 


Each of them was seen wearing a 'bubble helmet', which are intended to help patients breathe more easily.   


Another doctor, Dr Roberto Consentini was asked if COVID-19 is like ordinary flu. 


He said: 'No, it's utterly another thing.


'More pneumonia than flu...it's a very severe pneumonia and so it's a massive strain for every health system.'


The doctor went on to say: 'Every day we see 50 to 60 patients who come into our emergency department with pneumonia and most of them are so severe they need very high levels of [oxygen]. 


A makeshift hospital ward at the Spedali di Brescia hospital in Italy


More than 70 per cent of Italy's coronavirus deaths have been among men but scientists there admit they are mystified by the gender gap. 


Men are also more likely to pick up the infection in the first place and account for 60 per cent of confirmed cases, according to Italy's public health research agency.


An earlier analysis found the figures were even higher - that 80 per cent of the deaths were in men and just 20 per cent were in women - but the gap has narrowed over time.


Source: https://www.dailymail.co.uk

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Italian Doctor Describes Dying Patients Plead to See Loved Ones

Tap "WorldWire" above  to follow us



An Italian doctor has described the heartbreaking final moments of dozens of coronavirus patients before they succumb to the deadly virus. 


Doctor Francesca Cortellaro, who works at Milan's San Carlo Borromeo hospital, has had to witness patients saying goodbye to their relatives before they die alone. 


And Dr Cortellaro described the 'dramatic' feeling of watching patients say their final goodbyes to relatives, including one grandmother who she helped to say farewell to her granddaughter. 


A patient is carried from an ambulance at a hospital in Rome


The doctor told Italian newspaper Il Giornale: 'You know what's most dramatic?


'Seeing patients dying alone, listening to them as they beg you to say goodbye to their children and grandchildren.'


She added: 'They are lucid, they do not go into narcolepsy. It is as if they were drowning, but with time to understand it.


'When they are about to die, they sense it'.


And describing the moment where she did her best to help the critically ill grandmother, she said: 'I pulled out the phone and called her on video.


'They said goodbye. Soon after she was gone.'


The doctor added that she now has a long 'farewell' list of similar calls which she has helped patients to make.


Dr Cortellaro is just one of thousands of medics in the country who are battling on what is Europe's coronavirus front line - there have so far been more than 47,000 cases of the infection in Italy, more than any other country on the continent. 


Earlier today, distressing footage showed desperate scenes of doctors frantically trying to treat multiple patients inside a makeshift intensive care unit in an Italian hospital. 



With the site's Intensive Care Unit full, a separate emergency ward was full of patients on trolleys. 


Each of them was seen wearing a 'bubble helmet', which are intended to help patients breathe more easily.   


Another doctor, Dr Roberto Consentini was asked if COVID-19 is like ordinary flu. 


He said: 'No, it's utterly another thing.


'More pneumonia than flu...it's a very severe pneumonia and so it's a massive strain for every health system.'


The doctor went on to say: 'Every day we see 50 to 60 patients who come into our emergency department with pneumonia and most of them are so severe they need very high levels of [oxygen]. 


A makeshift hospital ward at the Spedali di Brescia hospital in Italy


More than 70 per cent of Italy's coronavirus deaths have been among men but scientists there admit they are mystified by the gender gap. 


Men are also more likely to pick up the infection in the first place and account for 60 per cent of confirmed cases, according to Italy's public health research agency.


An earlier analysis found the figures were even higher - that 80 per cent of the deaths were in men and just 20 per cent were in women - but the gap has narrowed over time.


Source: https://www.dailymail.co.uk

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