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More than 31,000 Chinese students have made their way back to Australia for the new term after spending two weeks in Thailand and other third countries to get around the governments travel ban, according to Australian media reports.


In some cases, the students have enjoyed quarantine holidays subsidised by their schools, which rely heavily on international students paying full tuition fees.


By travelling from China to a third country and spending two weeks in self-quarantine before coming to Australia, the students are able to satisfy the travel restrictions imposed since Feb 1 by the Department of Home Affairs in order to reduce the spread of coronavirus.


In some cases, however, self-quarantine simply meant partying in Thailand, said one report published by The Australian. Some of the trips are being funded by grants of up to A$7,500 from Australian universities, including the University of Melbourne, University of Adelaide and Western Sydney University.


Social media posts show some students using their quarantine period to enjoy holidays in exotic locations like Thailand, Malaysia and Dubai before returning to Australia, the newspaper said.



Some of the posts seen by The Australian showed a Sydney-bound female student on a beach in Thailand with four friends, another young woman shopping in a Bangkok mall, and Chinese students mingling with locals in Dubai.


Figures this week from the Department of Home Affairs show 31,196 Chinese students have now arrived in Australia since mid-February. The students have been arriving at a rate of about 1,000 a day, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.


When the ban on non-Australian citizens travelling from China was first announced on Feb 1, 106,680 Chinese students were overseas, either in China or elsewhere. The vast majority were enrolled at universities, with several thousand in high schools or vocational education.


Australian universities rely on international students for nearly one-third of their total enrollments, and the education sector as a whole enrolled 957,000 international students in 2019, according to a commentary in Foreign Policy magazine.


Nearly all of these students pay full tuition. And the biggest group of fee-paying international students at Australian universities, making up roughly 40% of international students and 10% of total enrollments, comes from China, the magazine said.


One Chinese student said she spent nearly A$20,000 travelling from China to Thailand to self-quarantine and make it to her classes at the University of Sydney.


Reports of the high expenses some students were incurring reportedly led some schools to offer to subsidise their travel costs.


Law and commerce student Karen Ji said in an interview with the BBC earlier that the ban had felt like a betrayal to our international students.


Chinese international students make up the largest international group for the (Australian) education industry. We contribute so much money to Australia every year, Ms Ji said.


On Feb 22, the travel ban for mainland China was eased slightly for year 11 and 12 students. Those students are now being considered on a case-by-case basis.


Source: https://www.bangkokpost.com


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Australian Schools Help Chinese Students Beat Travel Ban

Tap "WorldWire" above  to follow us


More than 31,000 Chinese students have made their way back to Australia for the new term after spending two weeks in Thailand and other third countries to get around the governments travel ban, according to Australian media reports.


In some cases, the students have enjoyed quarantine holidays subsidised by their schools, which rely heavily on international students paying full tuition fees.


By travelling from China to a third country and spending two weeks in self-quarantine before coming to Australia, the students are able to satisfy the travel restrictions imposed since Feb 1 by the Department of Home Affairs in order to reduce the spread of coronavirus.


In some cases, however, self-quarantine simply meant partying in Thailand, said one report published by The Australian. Some of the trips are being funded by grants of up to A$7,500 from Australian universities, including the University of Melbourne, University of Adelaide and Western Sydney University.


Social media posts show some students using their quarantine period to enjoy holidays in exotic locations like Thailand, Malaysia and Dubai before returning to Australia, the newspaper said.



Some of the posts seen by The Australian showed a Sydney-bound female student on a beach in Thailand with four friends, another young woman shopping in a Bangkok mall, and Chinese students mingling with locals in Dubai.


Figures this week from the Department of Home Affairs show 31,196 Chinese students have now arrived in Australia since mid-February. The students have been arriving at a rate of about 1,000 a day, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.


When the ban on non-Australian citizens travelling from China was first announced on Feb 1, 106,680 Chinese students were overseas, either in China or elsewhere. The vast majority were enrolled at universities, with several thousand in high schools or vocational education.


Australian universities rely on international students for nearly one-third of their total enrollments, and the education sector as a whole enrolled 957,000 international students in 2019, according to a commentary in Foreign Policy magazine.


Nearly all of these students pay full tuition. And the biggest group of fee-paying international students at Australian universities, making up roughly 40% of international students and 10% of total enrollments, comes from China, the magazine said.


One Chinese student said she spent nearly A$20,000 travelling from China to Thailand to self-quarantine and make it to her classes at the University of Sydney.


Reports of the high expenses some students were incurring reportedly led some schools to offer to subsidise their travel costs.


Law and commerce student Karen Ji said in an interview with the BBC earlier that the ban had felt like a betrayal to our international students.


Chinese international students make up the largest international group for the (Australian) education industry. We contribute so much money to Australia every year, Ms Ji said.


On Feb 22, the travel ban for mainland China was eased slightly for year 11 and 12 students. Those students are now being considered on a case-by-case basis.


Source: https://www.bangkokpost.com


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