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How to Exfoliate Dead Skin Cells Off Every Part of Your Body


Chinese mainland reports three new COVID-19 cases, all in Beijing


A total of three new COVID-19 cases were reported on the Chinese mainland on Tuesday, all were local transmissions, with no more deaths, according to Chinese health authorities on Wednesday.


All locally transmitted cases were registered in Beijing, the National Health Commission said in its daily report.


The total number of confirmed cases on the Chinese mainland stands at 83,534 and the cumulative death toll at 4,634, with 100 asymptomatic patients under medical observation.


The total confirmed cases in the Hong Kong and Macao special administrative regions and the Taiwan region are as follows:


Hong Kong: 1,205 (1,107 recoveries, 7 deaths)


Macao: 46 (45 recoveries)


Taiwan: 447 (437 recoveries, 7 deaths)



China suspends Sichuan Airlines Cairo-Chengdu flight


Chinas aviation authority said on Wednesday it would suspend Sichuan Airlines from operating the Cairo-Chengdu route for a week from July 6, after six arriving passengers tested positive for the novel coronavirus.


Last month, a China Southern Airlines flight from Dhaka to Guangzhou was suspended for four weeks over concerns about imported infections.


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Chinese mainland reports three new COVID-19 cases

 


 

 

Petrochemicals

The hole in the hedge

Oil companies favourite way to diversify isnt going to plan

 





Jun 27th 2020 | words 555

 

 

 

OIL ANALYSTS debate the future of transport fuels. That of petrochemicalsused to make everything from plastic packaging to painthas seemed unequivocally bright. The International Energy Agency (IEA), an industry forecaster, expects them to account for half the growth in oil demand from 2019 to 2025. Better yet, Americas shale boom has furnished cheap feedstock in the form of natural gas. ExxonMobil is spending $20bn on chemical and refining facilities along Americas Gulf Coast, near Texass Permian basin. Royal Dutch Shell is building a huge complex in Pennsylvania, atop the Marcellus shale formationPresident Donald Trump has called it one of the single biggest construction projects in the nation. Saudi Aramco, the largest oil firm of all, this month completed its $69bn acquisition of a 70% stake in SABIC, Saudi Arabias chemicals giant.

 

Covid-19 would seem to validate such moves. Use of petrol, diesel and jet fuel has plunged amid lockdowns but plastic packaging and medical supplies are in high demand. However, diversification that makes sense for any individual firm may prove risky for the industry as a whole.

 

On paper, the allure of petrochemicals remains strong. If the internal-combustion engine falls out of favour, the thinking goes, even sanctimonious environmentalists will still purchase polyester camping tents and synthetic sandals. The market increasingly punishes companies that invest in new drilling, so it seems only sensible to build crackers, sprawling networks of pipes and furnaces that break the molecular bonds in ethane, a substance extracted from natural gas, to produce ethylene, which can then be woven into those sandals, camping gear and much else besides.

 

The trouble is that too many big oil companies are making the same bet. Last year the increase in ethylene capacity was 60% higher than the rise in ethylene demand, according to the IEA.

 

The subsequent decline in ethylene prices had little impact on companies strategies. In November Bernstein, a research firm, tallied nearly $40bn a year in planned capital spending on petrochemical facilities from Shell, ExxonMobil, Total, Chevron Phillips Chemical, Aramco, Abu Dhabis ADNOC, Russias Gazprom and Rosneft, and Chinas Sinopec. All told, global ethylene capacity would rise by about 13m tonnes annually over the next few years, once again about 60% more than the annual rise in demand.

 

The pandemic does mean that oil companies have less cash for new projects. Cheap oil is also benefiting naphtha crackers in Asia, which produce chemicals from crude, and eroding the advantage of American ethane crackers, which rely on gas.

 

Even so, the coronavirus looks unlikely to sap individual oil firms enthusiasm for petrochemicals. Extra demand for single-use plastics during the pandemic has combined with lower appetite for recycled goods to lift ethylene prices a bit since April. Converting ethane to ethylene is still profitable, says Alan Gelder of Wood Mackenzie, an energy-research firm, just not as profitable as some hoped. For many oil companies facing sceptical investors and an upstream business with uncertain short- and long-term prospects, petrochemicals have the dubious honour of being among their least bad options. 






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Economist | The hole in the hedge

Love is in the Air


Every summer, Penny travels to a family reunion barbeque. Penny is never excited, and this year is no different. She dreads the drive.


She does not like talking to her relatives. And she does not like the smell of hamburgers. (Penny is a vegetarian.)


When Penny arrives, she sees lots of familiar faces. It is July and Uncle Vernon is wearing a sweater. Uncle Vernon is always cold. Its very mysterious.


She sees her cousin Polly. Polly has six children. The youngest one screams. Then the oldest one screams. Pollys children are always screaming.


She sees many of her other cousins in the field playing softball. They play a softball game every year, and it always ends in a big argument. Penny wonders, again, why they never solve it.


Then Penny sees an incredibly handsome man. She stares at him. He catches her staring. He smiles and walks over to her. Penny is very nervous. She is nervous because a handsome man is walking up to her and she is nervous because this handsome man might be her cousin.


The man sticks out his hand and says, "Hi, Im Paul."


"Hi, Im Penny," Penny says. "Are we related?"


Paul laughs. "No, we are not related. I am Vernon's nurse. He is sick and needs to keep me close by. But he did not want to miss this barbeque!"


"Oh, thank goodness," Penny says and then blushes. Penny always blushes when she is nervous, embarrassed, or hot, and right now she is all three.


Handsome Paul laughs and says, "Would you like to go get a hamburger with me? They smell delicious."


Penny smiles, "Sure. I love hamburgers!"


Previously Shared Stories, 

Enjoy Reading;


| Bond of Love and the Truth

| The Circle of Good Deed

| The Seven Wonders

| The Frog in Hot Water

| Your Chance of a Greater Good

| The Bridge

| Your Chance of a Greater Good

| Act of Kindness and Goodwill

| Happiness and Sorrow

| Developing a Relationship

| Dont let anyone steal your dreams.

| The Needs and Desires

| The Ant and The Dove

| The Lion and a Clever Fox

| Sometimes Just let it be

| Choose Your Words Wisely

| Hundred Gold Coins & Birbal

| Farmers Well & Witty Birbal

| Tenali Rama and the Brinjal Curry

| How long can you keep hatred in your heart?

| Appreciation of Hard Work

| Little Boys Meeting with God

| 100 Percent Love

| An Old Man Lived in the Village

| A Kings Painting

| This was bound to happen

| Wealth without a Value

| Learn to Appreciate

| Fox and The Goat

| The Golden Egg

| Who is Happy? The Peacock and The Crow

| The Three Questions

| The Old Man and the Three Young Men

| The Bear and The Two Friends

| Think Before You Judge

| Georgie Porgie

| A Wise Old Owl

| Baa Baa Black Sheep

| Beg Your Pardon Mrs Hardin

| A limit of your Kindness

| The Man and The Little Cat

| The False Human Belief

| Making Relations Special

| The Monkey and The Crocodile

| The Wicked Barbers Plight

| The Wooden Bowl

| Smartest Man in the World

| The Little Mouse

| Helping Others

| Fear vs Respect

| Little Boys Love for his Family

| Unity is Strength

| The Pig and The Sheep

| Father Son Conversation

| Whats for Dinner

| The Poor Mans Wealth
| Grandpas Table

| The Lazy Farmer

| Who or What do we love more?

| The Three Types of People

| The Cat, the Partridge and the Hare

| Birbals Wisdom

| The Travelers and The Plane Tree

| Boys Job Appraisal

| Birbal caught the Thief

| Five More Minutes

| The Kite without a thread

| Lesson Learned

| The Wet Pants

| Cycle of Evil

| The Farmer and the Snake

| A Man with a Lamp

| The King and Macaw Parrots

| A friend in need is a friend indeed.

| A Town Mouse and A Country Mouse

| Rose for Mother

| The Praying Hands

| One who read the future

| Always let your boss have the first say

| Crows in the Kingdom

| The Dreaming Priest

| Information Please

| Why Should I feel Bad?

| Two Frogs

| Baby Camel and Mother

| The Eternal Bond of Brother and Sister

| Dont let anyone steal your dreams.

| Always let your boss have the first say

| The Man and the Lion

| The Needy King and a Sage

| The Pot of the Wit

| Wealth without a Value

| The Eagle and the Woodcutter

| The Wild Doves

| The Swan and the Owl

| Zeus and the Potsherds

| The Wise Old Man

| Having a Best Friend

| A Soldiers Story

| Never to Give Up

| Looking at Mirror

| Lazy Donkey

| Controlling Temper

| Gift from Daughter

| Father and the Donkey

| The Seven Ravens

| Rodney Rhino's weekend Plans

| Sunny Days Favourite Sounds

| The Easter Story

| Simple Life Rules

| Ramu and the Mangoes

| Greedy Motu Mal

| The Snowdrop

| The Last Pearl

| The Fountain of Youth

| The Naughty Clock Winder

| The Magic Turtle

| The First Messenger

| The Cold Planet

| The Loss of Treasure

| The Turtle and the Monkey

| The Friend's Pot

| The Loss of Treasure

| Stubborn Goats

| Birbals Khichri (Rice)

| The Fox and the Grapes

| Boys Weakness

| The Rabbit and the Turtle

| The Rabbit and the Turtle

| Pundit and Rich Man

| The Best Practice Ever







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| Love is in the Air

Qualcomm announced the launch of its new Snapdragon Wear platforms for wearables, the Snapdragon Wear 4100 and 4100+.


Based on a 12nm process technology, these new platforms promise to breathe new life into the Android Wear ecosystem.


One of the first things users will notice is that, compared to the previous generation of Wear 3100 chips, the 4100+ platform will offer support for a far richer ambient mode, which can now show more colors in this energy-efficient mode all while supporting sleep tracking, live complications and adaptive brightness.


Traditionally, in the Android Wear ecosystem, the ambient mode was quite pared down compared to the live mode, but this new platform is going to change that. According to Qualcomm's data, most smartwatches spent 95% of their time in ambient mode, so that was an obvious feature to improve upon. For its sports mode, the watch falls back to a similar mode, which now features similar capabilities to keep you up to date while you are on a run, for example, and are using various sensors, maps and the GPS.

As for the actual technology, the 4100+ platform consisted of a main system Cortex A53-powered system on a chip that promises 85% higher performance compared to the previous generation, all while offering 25% longer battery life. The GPU itself is 2.5 times faster than only a generation ago, which should make for a far smoother user experience. Step counting, heart rate monitoring and more is handled by a tiny always-on co-processor, (it measures 5mmx4mm), while a 4G modem provides high-speed connectivity.

One other major advantage, especially for sport-oriented smartwatches, is improved GPS support with significantly lower power requirements.


For connected smartwatches, Qualcomm promises a 25% improvement in battery life (and these connected watches have traditionally had pretty dismal battery life).


If you really want to conserve battery life, a lot of recent Android Wear watches let you switch to a low-battery mode, which until now meant you only got to see the time. This 'enhanced watch mode' is getting a major update on the new 4100+ platform with the addition of step and heart rate support, a battery indicator, alarms and reminders (and yes, you can still see the time and date, too. It's a watch, after all).

It's worth stressing that Qualcomm will launch two variants of the 4100 platform, the 4100+, which features the main system on a chip, the always-on co-processor and the various connectivity chips, as well as the 4100, which will not feature the always-on co-processor.

The first watches to use the new 4100 chips will come from Mobvoi, the makers of the TicWatch line, and imoo, which will launch a kid-centric smartwatch based on the platform.


Resource: techcrunch.com

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Qualcomm launches its new smartwatch chips

A leaked Microsoft document recently hinted at the company's second next-gen Xbox, and now rumors suggest it will be fully revealed in August. Eurogamer reports that Microsoft had originally planned to unveil the console, codenamed "Lockhart," in June. Microsoft has now reportedly moved these plans to August, and Eurogamer claims the console will be named the Xbox Series S.


Microsoft has been working on this second cheaper next-gen Xbox console for months. A Microsoft document, leaked last week, shed some further light on the company's plans. Microsoft's Xbox Series X devkit, codenamed "Dante," allows game developers to enable a special Lockhart mode that has a profile of the performance that Microsoft wants to hit with this second console.


While we've been reporting this performance includes a slightly underclocked CPU, The Verge has seen additional documents that suggest Lockhart will actually have the same speed CPU as the Xbox Series X. The Lockhart console will also include 7.5GB of usable RAM, and around 4 teraflops of GPU performance. The Xbox Series X includes 13.5GB of usable RAM and targets 12 teraflops of GPU performance for comparison.


If the reports are accurate, Microsoft could choose August to unveil this second next-gen Xbox alongside pricing for the Xbox Series X. This second console is designed as a more affordable option, with 1080p and 1440p monitors in mind. Microsoft would have to detail some type of pricing alongside its Lockhart reveal, and it's reasonable to assume it will be heavily tied to the Xbox All Access subscription.


Xbox All Access is currently priced at $19.99 for an Xbox One S All Digital Edition subscription that includes Xbox Game Pass Ultimate (Xbox Live and Xbox Game Pass). Microsoft is also bundling its Project xCloud game streaming technology into Xbox Game Pass later this year, so a subscription next-gen Xbox console could be appealing to those who don't need the more powerful Xbox Series X option.


Resource: theverge.com

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Microsoft's second nextgen Xbox reportedly set for August reveal

Immersing yourself in virtual reality can feel like a sci-fi fantasy come true, but bulky, cumbersome VR headsets almost make it more trouble than it's worth. There have been various attempts to slim down VR headsets, such as Dlodlo's lightweight V One headset and Panasonic's prototype goggles shown at CES 2020. Now Facebook has revealed its own glasses-like prototype headset with a display measuring 8.9 mm thick about the same thickness as a smartphone.


In a new research paper entitled "Holographic Optics for Thin and Lightweight Virtual Reality," Facebook Reality Labs researchers Andrew Maimone and Junren Wang have proposed a VR headset design that replaces the refractive lens with holographic optics and polarization-based optical folding. This allows the headset to be much lighter and more compact, like a strangely thick pair of retro sunglasses.


"These two methods help keep the optics as thin as possible while making the most efficient use of space," said Facebook Research in a Monday blog post. "We anticipate that such lightweight and comfortable form factors may enable extended VR sessions and new use cases, including productivity."


VR headsets usually need to be large in order to accommodate a thick, curved lens, which changes the angle of light from the display before it reaches your eyes. This is what makes objects in VR appear further away than they actually are. 


Facebook's new proof-of-concept headset replaces this lens with holographic optics, which look like transparent stickers but bend light in the same way that a lens does. Facebook Research likens it to the holographic image on your credit card, only instead of creating a 3D scene it creates a lens. "The result is a dramatic reduction in thickness and weight," wrote Facebook Research.


However, holographic optics alone aren't enough to give Facebook's headset its slim design. VR headsets also typically require significant distance between the display and the lens so that the image can be focused properly. In order to reduce the gap needed, Facebook's researchers utilized polarization-based optical folding, also known as "pancake" folding.


To put it simply, pancake folding bounces light back and forth inside a lens a few times before it reaches your eye, increasing the distance the light travels while keeping actual physical distance small. As Facebook's prototype eschews bulky lenses, its holographic optics do the pancake folding instead.


"Our proposed approach is to design a pancake optic where all the focusing power is performed by holographic optical elements rather than bulk optics," Maimone and Wang wrote in their paper. Their research will be presented at the virtual SIGGRAPH conference in August.

As exciting as this is, Maimone and Wang note they are only in the research phase. Facebook's VR headset still has many issues that need to be worked out, and is years away from making it to consumers. 


For example, the headset currently uses external components such as light sources and display drivers which would have to be integrated into its small frame. The prototype was also designed to only show Matrix-like shades of green for simplicity, though Facebook's researchers hope to eventually use laser light sources for an even wider ranger of colors than standard Red Green Blue displays. 


Still, Facebook's relatively svelte VR headset prototype is an exciting step toward more practical VR, and potentially more widespread adoption of the technology. 


"Lightweight, high resolution, and sunglasses-like VR displays may be the key to enabling the next generation of demanding virtual reality applications that can be taken advantage of anywhere and for extended periods of time," wrote Maimone and Wang.


Resource: mashable.com

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Facebook reveals the future of VR headsets

The Sony A7S III might be just around the corner. While the name of the camera is not yet official, Sony's Kenji Tanaka confirmed that the "successor to the Alpha 7S II" will arrive this summer, according to an interview with DPReview. That release window will likely see the camera go head-to-head with the Canon EOS R5, another video-centric, full-frame mirrorless camera.


The A7S II, a popular camera for videographers, was released in September 2015. No details of the presumed A7S III were given, but Tanaka did mention both 4K/60p and 10-bit 4:2:2 as features that were requested by users. Interestingly, he also suggested a shift in how the A7S line will be marketed, saying that the S, which originally stood for "sensitivity," may now simply mean "supreme." This may imply the next A7S camera will have more megapixels until now, the A7S line has been known for its relatively low resolution of 12 megapixels, which meant each pixel was much larger, increasing its sensitivity to light. In practice, however, even full-frame cameras with many more pixels like the 61MP Sony A7R IV achieve excellent light sensitivity.


Additional resolution would also be needed for 8K video, which requires over 30MP. Rumors have long pointed to a 15MP sensor in the A7S III, although a 36MP sensor is apparently another option. Tanaka made no mention of 8K, but Sony may be looking into it if the company wants to stay competitive with the Canon EOS R5 on specifications. 8K isn't a necessity for the vast majority of customers, but the lack of it would lead to a perceived gap in performance between Sony's and Canon's video-focused models. Given that pricing remains a mystery on both cameras, it's impossible to say how closely they will compete, however.


RAW video might also be on the table. Without confirming anything, Tanaka said Sony is "working hard to deliver RAW capture" to professional video shooters. RAW video is another feature found on the upcoming Canon EOS R5.


Whatever the eventual spec sheet includes, Tanaka described the camera as being "all new." After five years, we should hope so.


Resource: digitaltrends.com

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After years of waiting, Sony A7S III may arrive this summer

It goes by many names: the TrackPoint, the nub, the mouse nipple, the pointing stick, the weird red dot on your keyboard. Love it or hate it, the famous or infamous mouse solution has practically become the symbol for ThinkPad's business-focused laptops. It's a well thought out, but ultimately failed alternative to the now-ubiquitous trackpad. But there's an argument to be made that it might actually be a better form of mouse for laptops, as bizarre as it is to use nowadays.


Pioneered by IBM in 1992 (before Lenovo took over the ThinkPad branding) and persisting to this day, the intention behind the TrackPoint is fundamentally different from other input methods: namely, unlike most other forms of mice, the TrackPoint relies on pressure, not movement. With a traditional mouse or trackpad, you're physically moving around an object in an analogous fashion to how you want to move the cursor, whether you're moving your finger on a trackpad or an entire mouse held in your hand. The TrackPoint functions more like a tiny joystick, though. The cursor moves around based on the direction and pressure you put on the nub. Apply more pressure, and the mouse moves (or scrolls) faster.

It's a much steeper learning curve to follow. It's easy to understand how a mouse moves, since it translates the movement more directly. Move your hand in a circle, and the cursor does, too. Move fast, the cursor moves fast. But the TrackPoint demands more skill. You have to learn how to apply pressure to move the mouse the way you want.


Despite that initial difficulty, TrackPoint aficionados claim numerous benefits for those willing to learn. Being located in the middle of the keyboard allows for nearly instantaneous access, instead of having to shift your hands down to the trackpad every time you want to move the mouse. Combined with touch typing, the TrackPoint promises an ultra-fast keyboard experience that never asks you to shift your hands or take your eyes off the screen.


There are other perks, too: The TrackPoint is infinitely scrollable, unlike a traditional mouse or trackpad, which requires repositioning your finger or hand when you reach the edge of your trackpad or mouse pad. It also takes up physically less space than a trackpad (although that's admittedly less relevant in today's world of larger laptops).


Not everyone agrees, of course: the TrackPoint dates back to a time where navigating documents and spreadsheets was the most important thing you could do on a laptop, and it's harder to use it for long, smooth motions (like, say, using a pen tool in Photoshop to outline a shape). Touchpads have come a long way since the 1990s, too. Modern touchpads are miles better than they used to be, with full-fledged multitouch gestures and integrated buttons, whereas TrackPoint technology hasn't gotten the same attention.

It's hard to imagine now, with touchpads having become almost universally adopted as the de facto control method for laptops, but at one point TrackPoints were just as viable an option for the primary mouse input for laptops, with other major companies like Dell, HP, and Toshiba all offering the input method. In an alternate timeline, the TrackPoint, not the trackpad, could have become the dominant mouse mode on laptops, instead of the minor curiosity it is today.


The appeal of the TrackPoint is one that many including myself find hard to explain. And based on the relative scarcity of pointing-stick mice on most products outside of the ThinkPad universe (the only other major device that I can think of that uses one is the New Nintendo 3DS from 2014, with its C-stick), it seems that most of the world agrees.


But even today, TrackPoint fans across the internet still swear by their favorite input method and will broker no argument that it isn't the superior form of computer navigation (the ThinkPad subreddit, for example, is full of appreciative posts). It's like non-QWERTY keyboard layouts in that respect: well thought out, potentially better-to-use alternatives that exist only at the fringes of computing because other input methods are so much more popular, and it would take too much effort to switch.


Despite the trackpad's supremacy, the TrackPoint still lives on: Lenovo's top-of-the-line ThinkPad X1 Carbon laptop, for example, still offers a TrackPoint side by side with a traditional trackpad. And of course, the TrackPoint II Bluetooth keyboard seen here makes it possible for you to use a mouse nub with any computer, if you prefer. David Hill, Lenovo's chief design officer at the time, might have said it best in 2017: "Some people get it and some people don't; some people acquire the taste. It's hard to explain, but I still think there's a use for it."


But ultimately, the TrackPoint is proof that as hard as it is to build a better mousetrap, it might be even harder to build a better mouse.


Resource: theverge.com

\n

The ThinkPad TrackPoint tried to build a better mouse

It goes by many names: the TrackPoint, the nub, the mouse nipple, the pointing stick, the weird red dot on your keyboard. Love it or hate it, the famous or infamous mouse solution has practically become the symbol for ThinkPad's business-focused laptops. It's a well thought out, but ultimately failed alternative to the now-ubiquitous trackpad. But there's an argument to be made that it might actually be a better form of mouse for laptops, as bizarre as it is to use nowadays.


Pioneered by IBM in 1992 (before Lenovo took over the ThinkPad branding) and persisting to this day, the intention behind the TrackPoint is fundamentally different from other input methods: namely, unlike most other forms of mice, the TrackPoint relies on pressure, not movement. With a traditional mouse or trackpad, you're physically moving around an object in an analogous fashion to how you want to move the cursor, whether you're moving your finger on a trackpad or an entire mouse held in your hand. The TrackPoint functions more like a tiny joystick, though. The cursor moves around based on the direction and pressure you put on the nub. Apply more pressure, and the mouse moves (or scrolls) faster.

It's a much steeper learning curve to follow. It's easy to understand how a mouse moves, since it translates the movement more directly. Move your hand in a circle, and the cursor does, too. Move fast, the cursor moves fast. But the TrackPoint demands more skill. You have to learn how to apply pressure to move the mouse the way you want.


Despite that initial difficulty, TrackPoint aficionados claim numerous benefits for those willing to learn. Being located in the middle of the keyboard allows for nearly instantaneous access, instead of having to shift your hands down to the trackpad every time you want to move the mouse. Combined with touch typing, the TrackPoint promises an ultra-fast keyboard experience that never asks you to shift your hands or take your eyes off the screen.


There are other perks, too: The TrackPoint is infinitely scrollable, unlike a traditional mouse or trackpad, which requires repositioning your finger or hand when you reach the edge of your trackpad or mouse pad. It also takes up physically less space than a trackpad (although that's admittedly less relevant in today's world of larger laptops).


Not everyone agrees, of course: the TrackPoint dates back to a time where navigating documents and spreadsheets was the most important thing you could do on a laptop, and it's harder to use it for long, smooth motions (like, say, using a pen tool in Photoshop to outline a shape). Touchpads have come a long way since the 1990s, too. Modern touchpads are miles better than they used to be, with full-fledged multitouch gestures and integrated buttons, whereas TrackPoint technology hasn't gotten the same attention.

It's hard to imagine now, with touchpads having become almost universally adopted as the de facto control method for laptops, but at one point TrackPoints were just as viable an option for the primary mouse input for laptops, with other major companies like Dell, HP, and Toshiba all offering the input method. In an alternate timeline, the TrackPoint, not the trackpad, could have become the dominant mouse mode on laptops, instead of the minor curiosity it is today.


The appeal of the TrackPoint is one that many including myself find hard to explain. And based on the relative scarcity of pointing-stick mice on most products outside of the ThinkPad universe (the only other major device that I can think of that uses one is the New Nintendo 3DS from 2014, with its C-stick), it seems that most of the world agrees.


But even today, TrackPoint fans across the internet still swear by their favorite input method and will broker no argument that it isn't the superior form of computer navigation (the ThinkPad subreddit, for example, is full of appreciative posts). It's like non-QWERTY keyboard layouts in that respect: well thought out, potentially better-to-use alternatives that exist only at the fringes of computing because other input methods are so much more popular, and it would take too much effort to switch.


Despite the trackpad's supremacy, the TrackPoint still lives on: Lenovo's top-of-the-line ThinkPad X1 Carbon laptop, for example, still offers a TrackPoint side by side with a traditional trackpad. And of course, the TrackPoint II Bluetooth keyboard seen here makes it possible for you to use a mouse nub with any computer, if you prefer. David Hill, Lenovo's chief design officer at the time, might have said it best in 2017: "Some people get it and some people don't; some people acquire the taste. It's hard to explain, but I still think there's a use for it."


But ultimately, the TrackPoint is proof that as hard as it is to build a better mousetrap, it might be even harder to build a better mouse.


Resource: theverge.com

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The ThinkPad TrackPoint tried to build a better mouse

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The severely wounded woman who was left outside Peace Arch Hospital in White Rock, B.C., last week and later died of her injuries was a Chinese citizen who'd only recently come to Canada.


Bo Fan, 41, was dropped off at the hospital in the early morning hours of June 17, police said, and was rushed inside for treatment but did not survive.

 

She had only been in Canada since February 2019, police said, and had been living in the Grandview Heights area of south Surrey. Little else is known about her.


Investigators believe she was last seen in the area of 168 Street and 27 Avenue the day before she was left at the hospital or earlier that morning.



She was associated with an organization called Golden Touch, also known as Create Abundance, an international organization with local ties that police called a spiritual group.


Cpl. Frank Jang with the Independent Homicide Investigation Team said they do not believe at this point that her death was random.


No one is in custody yet in the case.


Source: https://pressfrom.info




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Woman left outside B.C. hospital who later died was Chinese